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Apr

28

By:

Taylor Zakarin

Frank Stella (American, born 1936)
Washington Island Gadwall (Exotic Birds), 1980-81
Enamel, crayon and glitter on aluminum
154 x 225 x 26 inches
Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Collection

Frank Stella (American, born 1936)
The Waves, 1985-89
Screenprint, linoleum block, hand-coloring, marbling and collage
Each print 73 5/8 x 54 5/8 inches
Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Collection

Frank Stella (American, born 1936)
Illustrations After El Lissitzky’s Had Gadya: Front Cover; One Small Goat Papa Bought For Two Zuzim; A Hungry Cat Ate Up The Goat; Then Came A Dog And Bit The Cat; Then Came A Stick And Beat The Dog; Then Came A Fire And Burnt The Stick; Then Water Came And Quenched The Fire; Then Came An Ox And Drank The Water; The Butcher Came And Slew The Ox; Then Came Death And Took The Butcher; And The Holy One; Blessed Be He; Came And Smote The Angel Of Death and Had Gadya: Back Cover, 1982-1984
Lithographs, linocuts, and silkscreens print in colors with handcolor and collage on wove paper
Varying sizes
Edition 12/60
Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Collection

At NorthPark Center, we are lucky to have multiple examples of American artist, Frank Stella’s work. In fact, many in the know affectionately call Dillard’s Court “Stella Court,” because all the art on the walls around our beloved fountain are by the artist (Illustrations After El Lissitzky’s Had Gadya as well as Washington Island Gadwall (Exotic Birds)). Now, thanks to the Modern in Fort Worth, those who have come to love the Stella’s they’ve seen at NorthPark can explore the artist’s body of work in a fantastic retrospective, Frank Stella: A Retrospective.

Washington Island Gadwall (Exotic Birds), 1980-81

Upon his graduation from Princeton, Stella moved to New York City, where he effectively achieved immediate success. In fact, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City mounted a retrospective of his work at the ripe age of 34. Perhaps what made Stella stand out the most to me, at least as I first learned of his work as an art history major, was how he so masterfully blurred the lines between two-dimensional and three-dimensional forms. Even his early, minimalist paintings have exuberance to them (perhaps because of the clear delineated lines) that make the viewer feel like the colors are popping off of the canvas. His later work completely abandoned any notions of flatness – look at the Waves series or the Illustrations series on view at NorthPark. Through collage and inventive screen-printing processes, Stella manages to create sculptural paintings and prints that are dynamic, vibrant, and exploratory.

Frank Stella's Illustrations series in Dillard's Court. 

The exhibition at the Modern is hailing from The Whitney in New York City, where it served as the first solo show in the institutions new Renzo Piano structure downtown. Following its departure from Fort Worth, Frank Stella: A Retrospective, will be on view at the De Young Museum in San Francisco. I highly encourage everyone to take the trip to Fort Worth to see this incredible exhibition!

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